Memories of Camp Cody Weblog

November 22, 2016

Further Insurance Information for the Men at Camp Cody

Filed under: Camp Cody Deming — Tags: — Michael Kromeke @ 4:01 pm

The attention of officers and men in Camp Cody again was called to the special provision made for their protection under the soldiers’ and sailors’ civil relief act, which will permit them to carry without lapsing, policies carried by them prior to their entrance into the service. A division memorandum, issued by Captain C. A. Krauss, acting division adjutant, says:

“Did You Carry Life Insurance Before You Entered the Military Service?”

Attention is again called to the soldiers’ and sailors’ civil relief act concerning life insurance of men and officers in military service. Many soldiers are daily availing themselves of the opportunity for carrying protection under this arrangement, and no one should allow any insurance policy to lapse until he has fully investigated the benefits of this act. The insurance department of the division adjutant office, located in mess hall 4, section 5 will furnish any information desired and blanks for application may be filled out here. – El Paso Herald Newspaper – Thursday, May 16, 1918

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November 12, 2016

One of Camp Cody Soldier’s Songs

Filed under: Camp Cody Deming, Uncategorized — Tags: — Michael Kromeke @ 3:37 pm

Marching Through Deutschland

(Tune “Marching Through Georgia”)

Bring the good old bugle boys we’ll sing another song,
Sing it with a spirit that will start the world along,
Sing it as we’re going to sing two million voices strong,
When we go marching through Deutschland.

– – Chorus – – –

Hurrah! Hurrah; we’ll wreck the Kaiser’s throne,
Hurrah! Hurrah! the crowned heads they will moan,
for they’ll see some charging done like they have never known
When we go marching through Deutschland.

Our navy has the men and boats to sink their submarines,
We’ll shoot off all their periscopes we’ll use our men and means,
We’ll drive the kaiser from his throne and feed him pork and beans
When we go marching through Deutschland.

Our army wears the olive drab you’ll find they are no joke,
They’ll shoot the Germans full of holes and blow them up in smoke,
And when the Kaiser sees us come I think that he will croak
When we go marching through Deutschland.

The volunteers will do their part to win this world-wide war
For they will be there at the front to do their share and more,
We’ll drive the Germans out of France and charge them with a roar,
When we go marching through Deutschland.

Here at Camp Cody we’ve a bunch to man the Vickers gun,
Who when we reach the German trench think it will be great fun,
To drive the Kaiser’s minions out and shoot them as they run,
When we go marching through Deutschland.

Now Kaiser Bill if you don’t think that we mean what we say,
Just keep on with your dirty work until we reach the fray,
For when you find it is too late you will bemoan the day,
When we go marching through Deutschland.

Pvt. Floyd W. Worlley
Company A 127th Machine Gun Battalion
Camp Cody, New Mexico

November 6, 2016

Funeral of Corporal Leete at Camp Cody

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — Michael Kromeke @ 4:23 am

When the funeral service of Corporal James Hervey Leete, Co. B, 109th military police, was held Wednesday afternoon it proved to be one of the most unique ceremonies of its kind in the history of Camp Cody. Men from almost every organization in the Thirty-fourth division were present to pay their last respects to the departed soldier. Leete was on his fourth enlistment when he died. Prior to being transferred to the military police he was a member of Co. L, Second Iowa infantry, and after that regiment was broken up, was transferred to Co. C, 127th machine gun battalion. When part of that organization was scattered through the camp to make room for the men of the First South Dakota cavalry, he as taken into the military police. When news of his death went around, the old members of L company, of the old Iowa regiment, determined to attend the funeral in a body. Obtaining leave from the numerous organizations to which they belonged, the men got together in company formation and followed the casket to the railroad depot. In addition the company to which Leete belonged at the time of his death, attended the funeral. Corporal Leete was a man of unusual popularity. Although he was a man of who had talent enough to have been advanced to a commission, he is said to have refused to try for higher rank, though offered the opportunity several time, preferring to remain in the ranks. – El Paso Herald Newspaper – Saturday, April 6, 1918

campcodypano6

Camp Cody – Deming, NM – Panel 6 of 6

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